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Protect Yourself From Rain & Floods

Update: Wednesday, December 10th

The latest weather report from the BBC shows the emergence of a powerful ‘Weather Bomb’ causing disruption to the north of the UK.

The storm has brought high winds and huge waves to the UK coasts including areas in the North-west. The bad weather has hit power supplies and travel, and has brought hundreds of lightning strikes, cutting power to across the Western Isles temporarily.

As wind speeds are predicted to peak on Wednesday afternoon and evening, the Met Office warns parts of Scotland and Ireland to be prepared for gusts of up to 80mph.

What is a ‘Weather Bomb’?

A ‘Weather Bomb’ is also known as an explosive cyclogenesis. These ‘bombs’ occur when a storm intensifies as the pressure at its centre drops extremely rapidly.

This type of destructive weather happens fairly regularly, taking place several times during the year and more so at winter.

Weather Bomb

What’s next?

Already several train services have been cancelled and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency has put in place more than 20 flood alerts and warnings.

Schools, nurseries, libraries and museums have been shut in the Western Isles and police are advising people not to travel unless necessary. The Met Office have put out warnings for wind from today until tomorrow morning. Then into Friday, the severe weather is expected to move from the north to the south of England, the Midlands and Wales.

Keep up to date with the latest weather forecasts by visiting the Met Office website. Also stay tuned for updates from us. Stay safe and feel free to share your thoughts in the comment section below or via social media.

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Update: Monday, November 17th

According to recent reports, this winter could be set to be the wettest for more than 30 years.

The Independent online reported that heavy rainfall and storms are forecast for the next 3 months, with these conditions making their way from the west Atlantic Ocean, over to the UK. The research that has been carried out by the Met Office suggests that this winter has the potential to be the wettest since 1981.

The rainfall over the last few weeks has been well above average with flood warnings already being issued in places such as Exeter, Stratford-upon-Avon, Southampton and Surrey.

It was only last month that we saw Hurricane Gonzalo affect the UK. However there is no reason yet to believe that this weather trend will be declining any time soon.

To find out more about the latest research, visit the Met Office’s website.

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Now winter is on its way, it’s only natural that we are going to get fed up of the windy and rainy weather. A bit of rain isn't usually a worry but when it starts to become torrential, it is time to consider how best to protect yourself and home from the damaging effects.

Extreme weather conditions can cause flooding and damage to your home and garden so it’s important to take crucial steps to stop this from happening. The good news is that there are a lot of different things you can do to prepare for any heavy rain that does come your way…

Flood Barriers

Using sandbags is a well-known method of stopping floods getting into your property. Use them to block openings such as doorways and drains, as well as sinks, toilets and bath drains. You can also weigh-down items such as manhole covers and garden furniture with sandbags.

Before you start laying your sandbags, make sure you clear any debris from the areas to be covered. It is a good idea to place a large sheet of tarpaulin between the sandbags and the wall of your house, and position the bags lengthways, pointing into the direction of the water flow.

Overlap the sandbags as you stack them up in layers. They should then be stamped on to keep them firmly in place.

There are other flood barriers solutions available too. You may want to invest in barriers or another type of flood protection instead. Just make sure that all the people you live with know where they are kept and how to use them.

Essential Items

We recommend that you stock up on a few supplies and prepare a kit full of items such as your insurance documents and a list of helpful numbers, including your local council details and local emergency services. You should also get together information such as your bank details and store them in waterproof bags.

In your emergency kit, it is also important to have any essential medication, drinking water, non-perishable food, children’s’ items such as baby food, nappies and clean clothes, pet food and bedding, and a torch with extra batteries.

In your kit, you should also keep a battery-powered radio, a first-aid kit and blankets.

Handy Tips

  • If the rain is particularly bad and there is a lot of flooding, it is best not to leave the house unless you have to.
  • Don’t attempt to walk or drive through flood water and make sure you know how to turn off the gas, electricity and water at the mains in case you need to do this at some point in poorly lit conditions.
  • Store valuable items in waterproof bags and keep them upstairs or in the attic.
  • Keep up to date with the weather by tuning into local TV and radio, or sign up to receive flood warnings at Floodline Warnings Direct.
  • It is also good to keep a note of the contact number for Floodline in case you need to find out the latest flooding information in your area.
  • Floodline: 0345 988 1188 & 0845 988 1188

    (24-hour service)

    For more advice on what to do in the case of a flood, visit the Met Office website or Gov.uk. Don't forget, you can share your own helpful tips in the comment box below or get in touch via social media. We look forward to hearing from you.

    Comments

    Liam Roggers

    Never heard of all of these weather terms before, I've been schooled! Interesting to read about the science behind it all.

    Leave a comment

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